Get around

Both sides of the park are well served with foot trails.

On the Argentine side of the park there’s a small train leaving about every half an hour from near the entrance going all the way to the beginning of the trail to the Garganta del Diablo.

On the Brazilian side, there’s a bus service connecting the falls with other activities. That service runs from the entrance to the end of the park every 10 minutes in both directions.


See

The Iguaçu Falls are an awesome sight as tonnes of water throw themselves over cliffs and the mist rises amongst the jungle. They are taller than Niagara Falls, and twice as wide, for which Eleanor Roosevelt is said to have exclaimed on her first sight of the Falls: “Poor Niagara!”

It is well worth spending a day on each side of the falls, especially if you plan to do any of the boat rides or other activities offered.

Don’t just rush past the main viewpoints and leave. It’s important to get a good perspective on the park overall to appreciate this awesome sight.

Whilst the majority of the falls are in Argentina, a better overview is had from the Brazilian side.

Argentine side

On the Argentine side (260 AR$ pp (as of January 2015 plus $25 for parking a motorcycle), second day for half price if you get your ticket stamped before leaving on the first day, subsequent days are free if you tell them you are staying at the Sheraton). Flooding closed many paths in June 2014, but they are now reopened though see Garganta del Diablo below. Wear waterproofs and protect your camera as it can get quite wet on some viewpoints. Some people visit the waterfalls in swimsuits (recommended in summer). The park itself is fairly well organized, they have a train line so you can get from the entrance to the main circuits (Circuito Superior, Garganta del Diablo, etc. See bellow). They also have food stands inside the park close to the train stations, but food and drinks are very expensive there. It is a good idea to bring some food and water if you are going to spend the day on the park.

There are five main tracks all of which are paved and well marked with the exception of Sendero Macuco:

Circuito Superior – is a short walk to some nice viewpoints along the upper rim of the waterfalls.

Circuito Inferior – is a longer walk on the bottom end of the falls with the main attraction being the lookout to watch Salto Bossetti and Dos Hermanas. This pathway leads also to the free ferry service to Isla San Martin (that may or not be closed), and the tour operators.

Isla San Martin – has two main lookouts to different sides of the falls. There are also a lot of birds. Access by boat only (free). This may be closed when the river level is high. You can always ask the park authorities or watch the information tv sets within the park to see if the access to the island is open. CURRENTLY CLOSED! (Oct 2014). Check with official park center for more details.

Garganta del Diablo – The main attraction of the Argentine side – do not leave without having seen it. There is a free train running up to a 1 km-long walkway across the river to stand just back from the main horseshoe of falls where the roar and spray are most tremendous.

Sendero Macuco – is the trail through the rainforest to the Arrechea waterfall and is a good way to get away from the crowds. It’s about 7 km return on an unpaved but easy path starting at the Estacion Central. Swimming is possible beneath the fall, so consider bringing a bathing suit and towel. An informative brochure for the trail is available from the park information desk. It is recommended to do it in daylight, so don’t start it if it’s 3 or 4PM.

 

  • boats.Go in boats on the river

Brazilian side

On the Brazilian side (49 R$ pp (May 2014), cheaper for Brazilian residents and Mercosur) you get an excellent overview of Devil’s Throat and the rest of the falls, from both above and below.


Do

Spectacular boat trips can be made under the falls.

Argentine side

  • Iguazu Jungle Explorer, info@iguazujunglexplorer.com: offers trips, including boat rides (recommended) and rides on 4WD trucks through the park (not so interesting – the highlight of the long trip is the same as the short one). To be booked near the entrance or on the circuito inferior before going down to the ferry. If you do one of the boat rides (AR$180 for a short one, AR$380 for a long one which also takes you some way down the river), prepare to get soaked to the skin (you’ll receive a dry bag for your camera).

Brazilian side

  • Macuco Safari: offers boat trips up to the base of the Iguaçu Falls in 20 person zodiac boats. Your tour starts at the roadside entrance gate where you board the truck that will take you through the jungle towards the drop-off point. A narrator will describe the fauna that are –Jimknows(talk) 18:39, 1 July 2013 (EDT) along the way. At the end of the ride, you have an easy hike down to the dock where you should put on your raincoat, a life preserver and place your valuables/dry things into plastic bags. The ride up the river to the falls is quite fun as the boats are powered by the two large motors that are needed to navigate the rapids. During the ride, the journey is video captured for your later purchase. The captains know the rapids well which means that every chance they have to dip the boat and soak the passengers is done. The first pause is at a the beginning of the falls near the launch point for the Argentinian boat tours. There is time for photos and then to re-wrap your camera and up the river towards the Devils Throat. You cannot get that close the large falls as it gets exceedingly rocky in the river which prevents them from going all the way to the base of the falls. However, the captain will get you very close to going under the falls whenever he can. One note:you will get wet– a raincoat is not enough.

If you go all the way to the “Las Cateratas” station, you will be offered e.g. wildwater rafting & abseiling activities at better rates. When you arrive shortly before the activities close for the day or they’re just not busy you can easily bargain about the price and get a really good rate!

 

Powered by
Booking.com

 

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on StumbleUpon